How can you drastically increase your chances of getting hired as a Freelancer?

Every freelancer I’ve ever spoken with has usually asked me this one question, “How can I find better quality clients and win more freelance projects?”.

I’ve been working with Nabbesh.com, a freelance marketplace based in Dubai for nearly two years and believe I’ve found a formula which works almost every time for successful freelancers! Here are my top tips to make sure you drastically increase your chances of getting hired as a freelancer:

Continue reading → How can you drastically increase your chances of getting hired as a Freelancer?

Empowering youth – the freelance way

There are multiple ways going freelance can empower young people. Whether you are looking to fill up your free time with a couple of challenging tasks or break the routine that has been dictating your life, a challenging freelance project can make for an exciting experience whose lessons could stay with you forever.

The financial benefit

I don’t blame you if when you say, see, hear or read the word “job”, the first thing you think of is “how much?” We all work to make money—at least the vast majority of people. The flexible nature of student freeancerfreelance work and the fact that most projects are short-term could lead to a freelancer being paid higher rates than those a full-timer would be receiving for doing the same exact job. Looking for freelance work might be your best option if you’re a university student looking to make some pocket money while still having some extra time to do homework, read, or go out with friends. While some worry that freelance might not be a stable prospect in the long run, a bigger number of clients—and more projects—can ensure an almost-stable flow of income. Perhaps one of the best advantages of being a freelancer is the fact that you usually don’t have too many expenses — make sure to inform the client beforehand if you need to go to the field, travel, or buy material, and make sure to make sure they will cover the expenses. Starting to make money at a young age leads to financial independence, and the latter not only liberates you, but also empowers you.

Developing skills before you hit the marketplace

Although you might choose to go exclusively freelance and never have to spend time in an office ever again, you might also decide to accept a full-time job offer at a certain point. Regardless of the professional direction you deem fit, it is crucial that you start working on acquiring and developing basic skills so that when you hit the marketplace, you do so running. Freelance work can complement your studies in a way that classes and professors can only talk about—theoretically, for the most part. Marketing yourself as the right person for the job, agreeing with clients on the terms and conditions of a task, delivering, reviewing and finding quick, effective solutions to overcome daily obstacles are all activities you would have to do on an almost-daily basis while freelancing your way through the pre-career phase of your life. More know-how and a set of social skills is bound to empower you, maybe not overnight, but most definitely somewhere down the line.

Staying ahead of the curve

Competition is fierce out there. It’s a cut-throat job hunt that could leave many scarred for life, especially if you’re one of those people who get their hopes a bit too high a bit too fast. Although you will most probably be scanning the market for entry-level positions upon graduating from university (or high school if you’re too eager), all employers will ask you to submit both a CV and a cover letter, and they usually expect neither to be blank. Being a freelancer is in many ways similar to doing an internship at home. Only difference is: you would actually be doing work! By the time you decide to apply for more senior, higher-paying positions, you would have managed to learn and achieve more than your peers of the same age.

 

What 4,000 Freelance Jobs Teach Us About Hiring In 24 hours Or Less

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Our goal is to help you get your work done more efficiently by connecting you with freelance talent online.  We have broken a few records along the way with our rapid job fulfillment rates: most are filled within 24 hours!  Time is money, so to help you get the most out of hiring through Nabbesh, we’re sharing our observations from reading over 4,000 of our freelance job listings.  It turns out hiring the perfect freelancer starts with a great freelance job post.  Here are a few tips to help you write up the job post that will get your work done even faster!

8 notable features in the best job postings:

1. An interesting job title which captures the essence of your job and any special characteristics you are looking for!  For example, “Creative Mobile Web Developer” is better than “Web Developer.”  The more descriptive you are and the more key words you hone in on, the better Nabbesh can help match you to a suitable candidate.

2. Required Skills: What skills or technical competencies are required to complete your job?  Make sure you select a few of the skills that best describe the skills you need to complete your freelance job.

3. Job Description: Know and state your key outcomes for this freelance job and what your key deliverables will be.  For example, you may be looking to hire a photographer to take pictures of your upcoming party.  A key piece of information would be the date of the party and what pictures you would like captured at this party.

4. Samples of work: Nabbesh allows applicants to attach samples of their work to their applications on the Workflow form.  We recommend you ask for samples of their work especially since this can be one of the best indicators of whether you like someone’s style of writing (for example).

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5. Deadlines, deadlines, deadlines!  We cannot stress this enough.  Make sure you list your specific timeframe.  If your job must be done by June 1st, put that in the description.  Also, if your job requires multiple deliverables, you should also put those in the job description.  Being specific with your expectations will eliminate candidates from applying to your job who cannot meet your deadlines,thus saving you time!

6. Budget: Be very specific when it comes to your budget.  Nabbesh offers two types of contracts: hourly rate and fixed-price contracts. There are benefits to both, depending upon the budget and scope of the project, but the clearer you are up front with your budget constraints, the more time you save since xpectations will be managed up-front.  You don’t want someone applying who charges an hourly rate 50% higher than your budget allows.

7. Flex work, online or on-site?  State whether your job requires the freelancer to work on-site (and where) or whether it can be done online or flexibly.

8. Start-date:  We know you probably wanted someone to finish your job yesterday, but let us help you find someone today!  Make sure you input the start date so the freelancer will know whether or not to apply to your job based upon their schedule or commitments.   

Final thoughts: The more specific you are, the greater your chances for a successful match and the less time you will spend explaining your specific requirements to each applicant before they can submit a proposal for your job.  And remember, our owls are always here to help!  If you need more help posting a freelance job on Nabbesh, just give us a shout at: support@nabbesh.com or tweet to us @nabbeshtweets 

If you are really short on time, we offer bespoke hiring services to fill your job requirements.  Enquire about Nabbesh’s Talent Management Solutions directly at +971-52-787-1114.

Nabbesh’s Top 5 Tips For A Successful Freelancing Life!

Freelancing is a way of life! It starts with the yearning for independence and the drive to pursue one’s passion. Ultimately it’s a different way of thinking about work beyond the traditional 9-5 model.
Globally, independent work is becoming more popular, according to the 2012 US Freelancer’s Union; nearly 1 in 3 Americans are now freelancers.  In a 2014, Deloitte Millennial Survey (Millennials will represent 75% of the total global workforce by 2025), 70% of Millennials want to work independently at some point in their lives versus working in a traditional organisation. Times are changing!

 

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Here Nabbesh offers the top 5 tips for becoming a successful freelancer:

1) Be honest with yourself. Start with an honest assessment of your strengths and weaknesses.  Are your skills “freelanceable?”  For example, it may be much easier to get into freelancing if you are a copywriter or a photographer than if you are a civil engineer or an oil & gas operations person. Continue with an assessment of your communication skills. Succeeding as a freelancer means becoming an expert at “selling” your services, dealing with difficult clients, being assertive when it comes to scope of work and being an impeccable communicator. Do you have what it takes?

2) Networking is key. In the early days of freelancing, who you know can help open doors to get you those first few gigs! Platforms like Nabbesh can give you exposure to thousands of clients from across the region which instantly increases your chances of finding suitable projects & getting paid for your work. Whether you do it online or offline, networking is vital to getting you started and to your ultimate success!

3) Guard your reputation. Work on building your personal brand as a freelancer.  Use social media to position yourself as an expert in your field and stay up-to-date with the latest industry trends. Above all make sure that you treat your clients like royalty!  Always under promise and over deliver. Take pride in what you do and deliver quality work. Take responsibility if your client is not satisfied and be honest about your capabilities. Reputation is paramount and one mistake may cost you clients, or even, your freelance career.

4) Patience is a virtue. Building a freelance career means you’re in it for the long haul. Success requires perseverance and patience. Both are needed to build a solid portfolio of clients, a steady flow of income and projects.  Don’t give up quickly if things don’t work out as quickly as you had expected!

5) Work smart, not just hard.  As a freelancer, getting the right opportunities is more critical to your success than just getting opportunities.  Don’t be afraid to offer “sample” work or give a discount to “land” a strategic client.  Do your research and carefully seek out the clients you would like to work with.  Look for opportunities to connect with them and check what your peers are doing as well and how they are presenting themselves.  This will provide you with some insight on pricing your services at the right level and make you competitive in the market. Most importantly, make sure to enjoy your work and then everything else will fall into place!

 

8 Practical Tips for MENA Freelance Journalists to Keep Business Rolling

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Today’s blog post comes from Ahmed Medien who specializes in online publishing, blog writing and social media marketing. Ahmed has experienced freelancing first-hand after he left his writer job at Tunisia Live (Tunisia’s leading news website) in January 2012. He has tried it all and has failed on several occasions, but has acquired, in the meantime, a lot practical knowledge about the profession. He also had the chance to meet other freelance journalists from everywhere in the region. 
 

If you are a freelance journalist in MENA, then worry no more. There is tons of work for you and a lot of opportunities to become a fully-established reporter in your area. The Arab Spring has brought a lot of change and dynamics to the region. And, most importantly, the world is still hooked to our news. The demand is virtually high, and you are the supplier.

Here are 8 useful tips to become the next legitimate source on Middle Eastern affairs.

The purpose of this post is to help freelance journalists position themselves both financially and professionally in the MENA media industry, and also improve your status as a freelance journalist.

1) Know your priorities

It is important to establish some priorities before getting into journalism. Journalism is a very demanding job. It can be both frustrating and exhausting if you don’t prepare or, as I call it, strategize enough for the job. Your career might not even pick up if you are not sure what you are trying to accomplish with this new job.

Therefore, it is useful to ask yourself some of these relevant questions before starting writing, filming, photographing, etc.: How many hours will you allocate to this new job? Is it going to be your main job? Are you mentally prepared to follow news around the clock in different countries and languages? Do you have the necessary technical skills to make it on top of the market? Are you ready to do it without pay?

Basically, you want to know where you are headed with this profession when you decide to take a stab at it.

2) Make the right investments

The word investments, here, could be interpreted literally and loosely as it could a more expensive phone plan, a tablet, your own website, a better camera, a better sound recorder, a video/sound editing software – you name it.

Basically, you want to make sure that you’ll be using your time and strategic location more efficiently through these assets to help you make the most of your experience as a journalist.

Internet on the go or a mobile device will help you stay connected with people and actions wherever you go if mobility is part of your reporting activity. A better camera will help you deliver better quality photos that will sell more in the market or attract more clients.

3) Get online

This is beyond obvious. It is the most efficient way to interact with your community, larger community, and also engage your audience with the kind of journalistic content that you produce.

4) Seek out an internship

Just like any other profession, you will need job credentials in journalism in order to be taken seriously by other publishers. Therefore, whether you live in a small or bigger city, try to find any media outlet that is hiring a new member in their team. This could be paid or unpaid, but it is really up to you to establish your priorities and must’s in your new career.

Preferably, you want to choose a media organization that focuses on your topics of interests be it a specific city or country, a “region”, foreign affairs, culture, etc. When you do start this new job, you want to absolutely make sure that your organization is completely onboard with staff writing or producing for other outlets. Otherwise, abstain, because it is not professional.

You will also need to quantify your experience at this new job so that you can display it nicely in numbers on your CV/portfolio. For example: I have worked x hours a week. I wrote x many articles with x thousands in unique views and social media shares. I covered x political/cultural/social demonstration events on the ground. I produced multimedia content (video, photos, sound bites) for my organization, etc.

5) Build up a portfolio

Do not limit yourself to your CV. Portfolios can make a difference when a media outlet is hiring a freelancer in the region. Your employer wants to look easily and quickly through your proven publishing, photographing or video experience and a portfolio is the best fit platform for that.

This is why you do also want to make an online portfolio. One of the most famous free portfolio hosts are Carbonmade.com. If you do believe that you even need your own website with more content to yourself, then you may also want to try breezie.com. It allows you a more aesthetic web presence that potential employers can scroll through easily.

6) Take initiative

You have got to take the initiative and go cover breaking news or any other interest of yours even if you don’t have any client yet on the line. You could always find people who would be interested in your work later. This really depends on your ability to market yourself and present your work, but that wouldn’t happen at all if you don’t have the necessary content.

Even if nobody reaches out to you personally and ask you to write or produce any media piece about a particular event, you can literally go to knock on other editors’ doors. Ask them if they would be interested to have this or that. Be creative and authentic with your coverage. This might or might not work. But, you will get some interesting contacts that you will keep for future uses and dates.

7) Narrow your breadth of coverage

This is something to keep in mind as long as you’re doing journalism. You do not want to be the kind of person who does everything. Editors will not take you seriously if you present yourself with a minimal experience – let’s say – and an alleged expertise in 10 different topics. You have got to pick one or two or three depending on what your experience is.

If you are Palestinian and have grown in the West Bank or Gaza, then you might know about the subject legitimately more than other fellow MENA freelancers. Topic expertise could be anything such as Arab Spring, war, Hezbollah, Palestine, business in the Gulf, culture, human rights, Iran, etc.

8) Pay

Pay is perhaps the trickiest subject among the other aforementioned tips. Excessive pay demands or expectations might draw some employers off especially that there are also many competitors in the media industry in MENA. Typical pay for more renowned international media organizations is often in the xxx dollars, but beware that these media companies do also know their way around the region as much as you do. Do not think of robbing anybody off. Never.

It’s hard to determine how much you should ask for pay i.e. your profit margin, as it really depends on your line of coverage, technical skills and experience. Therefore, it is best recommended to talk to peers and try to assess quantitatively and qualitatively the work expected to finish the job.

You have to send out the message clearly enough, though, at the beginning that you are expecting to be paid. You should keep some kind of leverage so that you can guarantee that you won’t be robbed off. However, in case you do agree to waive your rights to a fair compensation of your efforts, please make sure that you will commit your employer into health insurance if you know that you will be risking your life or any other legal liability of that sort.

 Did you like Ahmed’s tips? Follow him at @ahmedmedien or know more about his skills on Nabbesh 

Freelance Designer in Dubai – What is it really like?

We wanted to give you a peek inside the life of an expat freelancer in the UAE. Danny Ammounah is the CEO and Creative Director of The Design Hat, he is originally from the UK and has settled in the UAE since the 90’s.He started his own agency after working as a designer with agencies such as Fitch and retail art pioneers Gallery One for over 5 years.  And his guest post tells you why he took the plunge and how has his life changed as a freelancer. 

freelance designer in dubai

Every freelancer has his own history that led him to his true passion, which then turned into a dream job. This is a little insight into my brief experiences as a self-employed web and graphic designer. The life of a freelancer might seem somewhat idealistic, but in reality its hard work and your work ethic, and your willpower needs to remain strong in order to ultimately succeed. Prior to becoming self-employed I had a pretty regular working lifestyle. I worked all day 9 till 6, came home and usually had more work to do then. This was my life for a good five and a half years. Working for some of the largest design agencies in the UAE, this was an important time and life experience for me as it taught me the basic fundamentals of which I rely so heavily on today.

However, it started to get a little tiring and I saw freelancing as a way of easing up this hectic work schedule and starting a new chapter in my career. I mean why not? I had gathered all the necessary skills and know how over the years, why shouldn’t I take a slice of the cake? The thought of running my own business really excited me but also posed a great challenge as well. Not only would I need to do the actual design work, but there’s also the need to manage the finances, prepare the proposals, find the clients & also get those deals sealed. This is a lot to take on when you are used to having multiple resources and man power available to help collaborate on a project. Now it was just going to be me. It’s a frightening thought but as I found out it’s all about time management and adapting strong organisational skills to your everyday routine. In a way, I find this is the most enjoyable aspect of freelancing.

Being self-employed I have a strong responsibility to ensure that each piece of work I undertake is completed on time. How I manage that time is entirely up to me. If I want to leave my desk and got to the pool, I can. If that means making up the time by working into the early hours, that’s fine. As long as the deadline is clearly set, completed and delivered by then, who is to argue? Mostly, I have been trying to stick to a fairly standard 9 till 6 routine, mainly so that my life doesn’t completely go out of sync with others around me. The freedom to choose when and how much work I do is a fantastic feeling and that’s what really sold this gig to me.

However…

There is one minor downside that I have noticed. Freelancing can usher you into quite a lonely everyday working environment. Generally I’m very happy with my business and don’t get fed up easily, but being on your own Sunday – Thursday can start to test your ability to maintain sanity. To help alleviate this, I often head out to my local coffee shop or business hub and treat this like my mobile office. This a great way to meet other freelancers, take meetings and a puts you in a more creative and buzzing environment than that of your bedroom. One of the greatest surprises when I decided to go freelance was the fantastic support I received. Before I decided to go freelance, I did take the time to asses my options and really examine if this really was the correct move for me. I wasn’t sure at first and it’s never easy leaving a secure working environment for something somewhat unknown and usually risky. But after I took the plunge and the support I received through family, friends, emails and work referrals, I was in no doubt it was the correct decision for me.

If you can relate to Danny’s story, connect with him on twitter, or hire him as a freelance graphic designer via Nabbesh

How I Stumbled Into Freelancing as a Résumé Stylist

We are interested in learning about how people choose the freelance journey. This is a guest post by Yvette Ali who is currently a Résumé Stylist by night and homemaker and part-time student by day. Her exhaustive career spans over a period of 20 years in everything from sales, marketing, management, operations to small business. Originally from the United States Virgin Islands, she has worked and served clients both in the USA and the UAE. 

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After years of working the 9 to 5 lifestyle, I felt stifled. At day’s end, there did not seem like much room for creativity left in the corporate world. Rumors of company cutbacks pushed me to start thinking what if I lost my job? That in addition to the fact that I needed some extra cash to pay for my college classes pushed me to a brown study mode where I began to identify my marketable skill-sets. I had done a few résumés for my colleagues and students with great reviews and feedback – until one day someone offered to pay me to do theirs. Hence, my ah-ha moment!

I began on a small-scale and grew my clientele base over time via word-of-mouth and eventually social media. Although, this has never been a full-time gig for me, it has allowed me to work whenever I need to and make some extra income. There have been times, I’ve had to turn clients away. But I did not become a great resume-writer overnight, which is my key takeaway here: you must maintain a solid grasp of the latest developments in your area of expertise and focus on selling or marketing one skill that you have truly mastered. Clients looking for freelancers do not want a jack of all trades.

My advice to those who want to become freelancers is to take a close look at all of your current skills and interests to see if any of them can be turned into a freelancing career. This can be just about anything you’re really good at, have good knowledge of, and most importantly really enjoy doing. The possibilities are endless and can run from copywriting, business writing, and audio production to catering, cartooning, researching, social media virtual assistant, photography, proofreading, language translation, medical transcription, tutoring, voice-overs and dog training. The potentials are well worth looking into. Best of all, it’s a business you can run out of your own home right from your kitchen table, although I highly recommend establishing a home office free of distraction. You can establish your own hours and take it to any level you desire! Most  importantly, pursue a path that you REALLY are good at, otherwise you will find yourself pushed outside the door by your more qualified peers.

 

Interested in connecting to Yvette? You can reach her on twitter or via Nabbesh

Nabbesh freelancers! Here are 5 tips to land a job via Nabbesh.

We have recently been on a hiring spree to grow the Nabbesh team by recruiting expert freelancers from across the Middle East to work on specific tasks or even manage certain business areas.

Our needs range from technology related jobs, to data analysis tasks to business development and community management! So of course we put Nabbesh to the test!

We were not able to fill all the positions yet, however we thought we’d share with you our top 5 tips to land a job via Nabbesh. Quite frankly, these tips are built into our selection criteria!

1 – Be professional

No matter how friendly or casual a job description may seem, make sure your application is professional. Do not use jokes, caps, shorthand or inappropriate language. Before you submit your application, make sure it is free of typos or major grammatical errors; it can be a turn off for employers. Make sure you spell the employer or the company’s name correctly. If English is not your first language then clearly mention it in your application in order to set the expectations, employers will respect you for that.

2 – Read the job description

There is nothing more off-putting to employers than someone responding in a generic way for a specific job description. For example “I am interested” or “I can do the job” which can signal to the employer that you did not make any effort to address his or her needs. Take the time to read the job post, understand the requirements and address them in your application. Highlight key strengths that you may have in relation to the job like relevant industry or market experience, refer to your skills listed on your Nabbesh profile page as well as highlight your portfolio on Nabbesh.

3 – Be specific in your application

Employers have a short attention span and they quickly scan for relevant information with respect to their job post. Be brief, make sure you get the employer’s attention but not necessarily tell them your life story. Do not by any shape or form copy and paste your CV into the job application as this will certainly lead to your application being ignored. From our experience, CVs are secondary to how you phrase your job application and how you convince the employer that you are the person for the job!

4 – Show your enthusiasm

It is quite nice when you end your application with comforting notes like how much you would love to work for the employer, that you are willing to provide the employer with additional information if needed, that you are available to start immediately and that this is an opportunity that you wouldn’t want to miss! Flattery goes a long way.

5- Follow up

Employers may be busy and may forget to respond, or they may have several applicants that they are interviewing or several proposals to go through. If you follow the above tips, we are almost 100% sure that you will get a response. In case you don’t, it is always beneficial to drop the employer a gentle reminder mentioning that you are looking forward to hear from them and always offer additional information if needed to further emphasize why you are perfect for the job!

We wish you good luck! And we are still taking applications for the jobs on Nabbesh. To apply please visit http://www.nabbesh.com/careers

Top Five Tips from One Freelancer to the Other

This is a guest post by Zainab Mansoor, a freelancer journalist and contributor to various local and international publications. She is an equally doting mom and strives to strike a perfect balance every day.

Contrary to popular belief, freelancing or the freelance industry is a comprehensive order. There are clear do’s and don’ts in the business that should adhered to, but it differs from person to person, experience to experience. Below are a few of my personal tips to all freelancers out there, pitching for work or otherwise.

1- Let not your missives speak. Written letter with tall orders are so clichéd these days – Avoid them completely. Share your profile, portfolio and your list of strengths in which you excel or wish to excel. Instead of words, be dexterous in work.

2- Association is key. Keep contact with your previous clients. Stay in touch through social mediums for repeat work or referrals.

3- Avoid baring your desperation. If there is a dearth of projects up your sleeve, look at alternate avenues for work. Desperation can make people go all funny and do things they may regret a while later. Don’t under-rate your work or its value by offering work at substantial rates. Offering reasonable pricing for repeat clients make sense but ridiculing your profile is a different game altogether.

4- Respect thy privacy. Projects may or may not contain confidential company and employee information. Irrespective, avoid discussing project or work related details with associates, family or friends. Let the details stay locked on a workstation.

5- Sense of Humor, hold on tight. Do not let circumstances get to you! There may be white and black days, highs and lows, pleasant and not so pleasant criticism. Hang in there and lay supine, facing the sky. Crack a joke or two while you’re at it!

Have you found these tips useful? Let Zainab know and make sure to follow her on twitter  @zzainabmansoor!

6 reasons why you haven’t got the job on Nabbesh

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A few of you have been getting in touch to ask why you haven’t heard back from freelance jobs you applied for on Nabbesh. Similarly some employers are finding it difficult to get exactly the right skill set and find the freelancer they need.  This doesn’t mean you should give up trying! Here are a few tips:

  1. What would an employer want to see?

    First, put yourself in the shoes of a potential hirer.  What would you want to see on a persons profile that would make you say yes, i want to work with that person?  Have you given enough description to your skill sets? If you’re only putting a title and an indication of years of experience, this isn’t going to differentiate you from other freelancers trying to get the job.

  2. Attention to detail

    Second, read the job post very carefully.  Many employers try to filter out applicants by putting in a secret code in there to ensure the applicant has really understood the requirements.  These can range from instructions such as “please reply to the job post with the subject xxxxx”  or “if you can find the hidden mistake in this text, mail us the answer”.

  3. Be specific

    Third, try to avoid generic sentences in your reply such as “i will provide value to your organization”  and “I am confident I will be an asset to any firm…”  People posting jobs are looking for a very specific skill and type of person, so be specific.  Try to indicate why you are the right person for the job.  For example: if a job is requesting a video animator, and they have indicated they are a startup, you should let them know you understand what they want to achieve.

    You might want to try: “Whilst my skills as a video editor are unsurpassed as you can see from my showreel on my Nabbesh profile, I have worked with startups before and I understand time and cost is important to you.  I’ll be able to ascertain your requirements very quickly and deliver on time and within budget”

  4. Keep an eye on the competition

    Fourth, do you have a very popular skill?  You can check this by typing in your skill in the search box and seeing from the drop down how many people have the same skill.  Open those profiles, see which ones you think are better than others and take some tips.  See what other skills they list in parallel.  Decide what sets you apart from these competitors.

  5. First impressions count

    Fifth, presentation is everything.  Do you have a nice clear profile picture? Is the spelling correct? Have you used the Canvas profile builder to add in extras such as certificates, hobbies, education?  You can also link to work that is held elsewhere around the web for example any videos on youtube or vimeo, pictures on pinterest or flickr, posts on tumblr or wordpress and more.  The richer the profile, the more professional you appear

  6. Be proactive!

    Finally be proactive! Its a competitive marketplace, don’t just leave your profile up there and wait for responses.  Look at the top searched for skills, compare yourself to others, visit the site regularly and keep up with the latest news on the Nabbesh social profiles and other content channels.  We post lots of information that will help you in finely tuning your profile to current requirements.  By being aware of the larger picture, you can prepare yourself for a sudden demand in your skill set, and learn what the latest developments in your industry are.

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Happy Nabbeshing!