How to write the best job description on Nabbesh

Hiring freelancers is brilliant for temporary projects and testing new ideas when you’re growing a business. Freelancers can relieve labour constraints to do more without committing your company’s revenues to new full-time salaries. They can execute specific tasks while you focus on plans and strategy – sounds great, yes?

What jobs should freelancers do?

It is usually advised not to hire freelancers for a job that would have been otherwise filled by a full-time salaried worker. Throwing too many tasks at a freelancer (even if adequately compensated) without including them in team strategy and team dynamics will lead to bad synergy. Be specific about the nature of the job and level of commitment you require from your freelancers.

Dream-Job-Sign

Don’t hire freelancers for core jobs you cannot absolutely do or don’t know much about especially if the job is complex. It’s essential that you and the newly hired freelancer speak the same language (figuratively) and can meet on specific task accomplishments. Instead, hire for jobs you can do, but don’t have time to. Your knowledge and experience with the job will help you set specific goal metrics for the new freelancer and ultimately cut a fine a line between failure and success. In other words, you will know if you hired the right skills to fill the right job. How much did it take to get the job done? What problems did you run into? The feedback and observations you will make will help make better recruitment choices once you’re ready to expand your team and operations.

How to write a stellar job position

Keep it short

Freelancers are constantly looking for new jobs and more revenues. Make it easier for them to grasp the job responsibilities and your business model by writing less and saying more. Do include specific tasks to be fulfilled, goals to be achieved and a brief line about the company (product, size, industry…). If you’re looking for answers for a problem of yours, ask for a proposal. Put it up front. The applicants won’t miss it.

Add the right skills

clearWhen posting a job position on Nabbesh.com, we will ask you to add skills that will help us direct you towards the best talent on our platform. This feature will help us categorize your job description  to attract the right talent for your business. Vague skills will result in a flood of applications.

Responsibilities/results

This is the most important section of your job position. Be clear about the nature of the job and the results you’re looking for. Discourage unqualified freelancers to apply or screen applications with a specific question they all have to answer. Other screening questions are previous relevant experience and previous sample work. Set approximate goals to introduce your freelancers to the work ahead of them.

 

Empowering youth – the freelance way

There are multiple ways going freelance can empower young people. Whether you are looking to fill up your free time with a couple of challenging tasks or break the routine that has been dictating your life, a challenging freelance project can make for an exciting experience whose lessons could stay with you forever.

The financial benefit

I don’t blame you if when you say, see, hear or read the word “job”, the first thing you think of is “how much?” We all work to make money—at least the vast majority of people. The flexible nature of student freeancerfreelance work and the fact that most projects are short-term could lead to a freelancer being paid higher rates than those a full-timer would be receiving for doing the same exact job. Looking for freelance work might be your best option if you’re a university student looking to make some pocket money while still having some extra time to do homework, read, or go out with friends. While some worry that freelance might not be a stable prospect in the long run, a bigger number of clients—and more projects—can ensure an almost-stable flow of income. Perhaps one of the best advantages of being a freelancer is the fact that you usually don’t have too many expenses — make sure to inform the client beforehand if you need to go to the field, travel, or buy material, and make sure to make sure they will cover the expenses. Starting to make money at a young age leads to financial independence, and the latter not only liberates you, but also empowers you.

Developing skills before you hit the marketplace

Although you might choose to go exclusively freelance and never have to spend time in an office ever again, you might also decide to accept a full-time job offer at a certain point. Regardless of the professional direction you deem fit, it is crucial that you start working on acquiring and developing basic skills so that when you hit the marketplace, you do so running. Freelance work can complement your studies in a way that classes and professors can only talk about—theoretically, for the most part. Marketing yourself as the right person for the job, agreeing with clients on the terms and conditions of a task, delivering, reviewing and finding quick, effective solutions to overcome daily obstacles are all activities you would have to do on an almost-daily basis while freelancing your way through the pre-career phase of your life. More know-how and a set of social skills is bound to empower you, maybe not overnight, but most definitely somewhere down the line.

Staying ahead of the curve

Competition is fierce out there. It’s a cut-throat job hunt that could leave many scarred for life, especially if you’re one of those people who get their hopes a bit too high a bit too fast. Although you will most probably be scanning the market for entry-level positions upon graduating from university (or high school if you’re too eager), all employers will ask you to submit both a CV and a cover letter, and they usually expect neither to be blank. Being a freelancer is in many ways similar to doing an internship at home. Only difference is: you would actually be doing work! By the time you decide to apply for more senior, higher-paying positions, you would have managed to learn and achieve more than your peers of the same age.

 

The Do’s and Don’ts of uploading your resume and cover letter

If you are a new graduate or simply new to online freelance work, your definition of a good resume and a job-landing cover letter might blur. Where you should say more or leave some details untold might not be obvious if you want the job and you want the money.

Good resumes will get your foot in the door. Cover letters will reaffirm your employer’s initial judgement about you. A follow-up interview will usually get you a traditional job, but in the freelance world, it’s really just the proposal and the tenacity of your online profile that will get you hired fast.

comics-dilbert-job-interview-865505

Difference between a resume and a cover letter

A resume is an outline of your professional career in few sub-heads and bullet points. It will tell your employer where you went to school and particularly why your education is relevant to the job you’re applying for if at all. You will also have to list all relevant professional precedence. You don’t have to crowd your resume with jobs and details that are not important for the specific job or freelance job you’re applying for. A good resume is usually no more than 2 solid pages of solid, indispensable information about you. If you are applying for a job or a freelance position in Europe, they will ask you for a CV which is the same as resume in American English.

A cover letter is literally a letter in a traditional letter format. You will address the employer and you will tell them a few important details about yourself and your career as well as your accomplishment to take you seriously for their vacant position or the task to be fulfilled by you-hopefully. A good cover letter should not more than 500-600 words. It should be broken into clear paragraphs. A cover can be a great extension to your resume. This is your chance to elaborate on specific tasks you have undertaken and target results you have achieved for your previous employers. You don’t have to list every achievement as you probably should in your resume.

resume

How to write a resume as young graduate

If you are a recent graduate, you probably lack a solid professional experience to woo your future employers with. The appropriate length for your resume should not surpass one page. If you have been in multiple extra-curricular activities and can speak of genuine achievements or learning milestones in your internships, make it two pages. The best would be to cherry-pick the details you want to share with your employer. Don’t simply crowd your resume. If you’re applying via an electronic application system, chances are your resume will be filtered and shortlisted. This is a good opportunity to add more keywords that are relevant to the desired job position to increase your chances.

Do always submit your resume in a PDF file. This is the norm. When you’re a recent graduate, education should be first and foremost and then any relevant internships, part-time work or extra-curricular involvement. Do emphasize on your GPA or your local grade average as well as the courses you have taken in school, and the practical skills you do now possess.

Do’s

  1. Quantify all of your accomplishments (how many logos did you design, articles you wrote, events you managed, etc.)
  2. Be very specific about what you did. If you can’t put your tasks in words, simply avoid vagueness or ask for the help of a good colleague who filled the same position.
  3. Look up other resumes for people who had filled your previous positions and your desired one.
  4. Do make a profile with tailored university course selection and tasks carried out of school as well as skills.
  5. Do consider a resume design/template if you think your employers would require so. Several companies and higher institutions require the Europass template to manage conformity between applicants.
  6. Stick to one structure, one chronological order and one order when writing your resume

Don’ts

  1. Don’t lie.
  2. Don’t forget to add crucial information such as the duration of your internships or locations
  3. Don’t mix pronouns and verbs or tenses in your bullet points
  4. Don’t include interests or hobbies except when common hobbies will get you extra score points. You have to know before you gamble.

How to write a good proposal for a Nabbesh job

The best way to land a job on Nabbesh.com is to keep your cover letter or proposal short. Competition is tough. Often, an employer might not look beyond the few lines that will appear in the email or web notifications.

Do upload your resume (in PDF format) to back up your said experience or your solution to the employer’s problem. Start with what you will do for the employer. Include any specificity if needed and then elaborate why you’re fit to do what you say you can do. Past experience is a great proof of skills. Online reference is always the best way to make fast decisions and make the employer hit the “short-list” button or write you a response.

Be very specific about your charges from your second or third paragraph. Don’t write more than you should. Every line should be in direct context to the job you’re applying to, otherwise, do omit it. It’s for your best interest.

Good Luck!

 

14 Ways for the Class of 2014 to Land a Job

Congratulations Class of 2014,  you’ve just entered the real world!  And while you may only be entering with one expensive piece of paper, “they” say you needed it to get the one thing you are looking for right now: your first job!  Sure you face a few challenges, but Nabbesh is here to help with 14 ways to land your first job!

1. Ignore so-called conventional wisdom that says you need experience to get a job.  We all started from zero at one point or another in our lives.  Even the most successful people in the world started somewhere, and you can too.

2. You’re one of the most tech savvy generations in history.  Turn that into $. That’s right, you can actually get paid to use technology and social media.  For example, you could help a company grow their customer base or communicate through social media.  Lucky for you, there is much demand for people with the tech skills you often take for granted.

3. Surf the net.  Don’t just pound the pavement!  While getting your first job requires hard work, the best way to do that is by using the internet to find either online or offline work.

4. No clue at what you want to do?  Here’s a little secret, you aren’t the only one. Many people that have been working for years are still looking for what they want to do when they “grow-up.”  Start with what you enjoy doing and don’t worry too much if you take the “wrong” job.  It’s all part of the learning process.

5. Try writing about your job search.  Believe it or not, blogging and writing is a serious profession.  If you have the “write” stuff, you may find you can turn writing even about your job search into some cash.

6. Intern or volunteer to gain professional experience.  If you’re willing to work in a company or for a start-up without being paid, and you prove yourself, you may be able to land your first job in a few months.  Before you think interning is beneath you, remember that Microsoft founder Bill Gates started as an intern.

7. Ask for advice.  Start with a few of your friends or family members that have been working for a few years at least.  Ask them to sit down with you and to share what they did right or did wrong to find their first job.

8. Work for a start-up.  At this point in your life you can probably afford to work at a startup, and you’ll gain a wealth of experience about running a business, even if your startup isn’t the next Google.  If you think its too risky, remember that risk is simply what you have (no job) and what you have to lose (not much).

9. Be honest with yourself about what success means to you.  To find a job you love, don’t forget success means different things to different people.  Bill Cosby, the famous comedian once said, “I don’t know the key to success but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.”

10. Work for yourself.  What is it that you love to do on weekends?  Maybe you can monetize that.  If you love photography or digital design, you may be able to land freelance jobs in those areas or turn other hobbies into cash.

11. Happen to things.  Leonardo Da Vinci once said, “people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them.  They went out and happened to things.”  Don’t sit around and complain about the unemployment rates, make your first job happen by being proactive.

12. Be hungry and humble.  Older generations complain about how your generation is much more entitled than previous generations.  Fight this stereotype by being persistent, hard working, hungry and humble in your job search.

13. Diversification isn’t just good financial advice.  In today’s world, a diversity of experiences is very important if you want to truly stand out.  Maybe you studied engineering, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t seek a job outside of your major. Whatever you major in, you can work in another field which may give you a better perspective and insights into what your career “calling” is.

14. Passion over paychecks.  Don’t just find a job, create a meaningful life whatever that means to you.  Steve Jobs famously said, “the only way to do great work is to love what you do.”  Maybe you’re young, but work is going to consume so much of your life, so why waste a single moment?

Now go out there class of 2014 and get your first job!  Get started by creating your profile at http://www.Nabbesh.com and search for freelance jobs today.